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Table 1 Summary of the service evaluation procedures

From: Lifestyle change in the cancer setting using ‘the teachable moment’: protocol for a proof-of-concept pilot in a urology service

Data collection indicator Method of data collection Timing of data collection Planned analysis and reporting
Acceptability indicators
(i) Uptake to the service from men with a negative cancer screen Number of men receiving a TRUS biopsy who are invited to take part in the service via CNS face-to-face contact is logged via a routine audit database. Those who access at least one appointment for lifestyle change will be used as positive for uptakea. Ongoing throughout service delivery. Descriptive analysis using Excel. Reported as proportion using numerical units and percentages.
(ii) Uptake to service from men with a positive cancer screen Number of men diagnosed with cancer of the prostate in the previous calendar year (choosing an active surveillance protocol for cancer management) who are invited to take part in the service via patient letter is logged via a routine audit database. Those who access at least one appointment for lifestyle change will be used as positive for uptakea. Ongoing throughout service delivery. Descriptive analysis using Excel. Reported as proportion using frequency counts with percentages.
(iii) Difference in uptake using socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of patients Age (at invite for appointment), deprivation category (from postcode), named consultant and type of patient (cancer/no cancer diagnosis) are taken from patient information summary and logged via a routine audit databasea. Ongoing throughout service delivery. Logistic regression using STATA to use socio-demographic and clinical characteristics as predictors of accessing the service. Reported using odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals.
(iv) Consent for service evaluation Patients are asked to provide consent to be involved in the service evaluation during their first lifestyle appointment. Numbers of men consenting logged via a routine audit databasea. Ongoing throughout service delivery. Descriptive analysis using Excel. Reported as proportion using frequency counts with percentages.
(v) Patient experience and satisfaction with the service All patients are sent a short self-completion postal survey to gather information on their experiences of the service (patient experience survey). Data collection is via a postal questionnaire, which is sent to them along with a covering letter, and is returned via a freepost envelope. Information is entered into a separate database. The survey asks for a response (i.e. tick box and return of survey) even if the patient decides not to participate.
More detailed information below.
Patients are sent an anonymous questionnaire 2–4 weeks after their first appointment. Descriptive analysis using Excel.
Reported as proportion using frequency counts with percentages.
Satisfaction data reported as mean (s.d.).
Open-ended comments analysed thematically (with counts) and a selection reported as direct quotations.
Feasibility indicators
(i) Number and duration of appointment(s) Each appointment date, length and type (face-to-face or telephone) for each patient is logged via a routine audit databasea. Ongoing throughout service delivery. Descriptive analysis using Excel. Reported as median number, length with IQR and type of appointment using frequency counts with percentages.
(ii) Number and type of behaviours discussed A record of the number of health issues and behaviours (amenable to change) that are discussed with patients is logged via a routine audit database. These are split into primary and secondary issues/behaviour (e.g. if weight loss is the main area of discussion this would be coded as primary with diet, physical activity and alcohol use coded as secondary areas). Ongoing throughout service delivery. Descriptive analysis using Excel. Reported as median total number (and for each behaviour) using frequency counts with percentages.
(iii) Number of lifestyle change goals set A record of the number and type of goals set by patients is logged via a routine audit databasea. Ongoing throughout service delivery. Descriptive analysis using Excel. Reported using frequency counts with percentages.
(iv) Length of time taken to compose letters Time taken to compose patient letters is logged for each patient via a routine audit databasea. Ongoing throughout service delivery. Descriptive analysis using Excel. Reported as median with IQR.
(v) Changes to health behaviours All patients taking part in the TRUS biopsy procedure are sent a short self-completion lifestyle survey (lifestyle survey as par covering several items (see detailed information below)). This is sent to them along with a covering letter describing the TRUS procedure (routine practice). Patients return this survey in person to the CNS at the first appointment who passes this information on the Health Psychologist. In some cases, patients may complete the survey during the first appointment (if not otherwise completed).
Active surveillance patients receive the lifestyle survey via a letter confirming their appointment for a lifestyle consultation. They are asked to bring the survey with them to their appointment. In some cases, patients may complete the survey during the first appointment (if not otherwise completed).
For repeat data collection, a postal survey is sent out to patients. If patients have failed to respond within 2–4 weeks, up to 3 phone calls are made to remind the patient about completion of the survey. The repeat survey can be completed over the phone during this call if preferred.
Patients are asked to provide consent to be involved in the service evaluation during their first lifestyle appointment. Information from the lifestyle survey is entered into a separate database.
More detailed information below.
For TRUS patients, the lifestyle survey is completed prior to attending their biopsy appointment.
For active surveillance patients, the lifestyle survey is completed prior to their first consultation appointment.
A repeat survey is completed approximately 3 months following their first appointment to assess any pre-post changes.
Descriptive analysis using Excel.
Using a coding system patient lifestyle change from pre-post is coded as worse, no change, moderate or substantial change in their primary and secondary health behaviour areas (those discussed during the consultation). Reported using frequency counts with percentages.
See more detailed information below.
(vi) Clinical staff knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding lifestyle change practice Questionnaire sent by email via to all consultant urologists and clinical nurse specialists in the Department. Data collection via online Survey Monkey. Information is entered into a separate database.
Staff consent to be involved in the survey. Consent is implicit and confirmed via their participation in the survey. Information is collected anonymously.
Sent approximately half way into proof-of-concept pilot.
Reminder email sent 2–4 weeks later requesting response.
Descriptive analysis using Excel.
Knowledge, attitude and practice information reported via mean (s.d.) for each item.
Open-ended comments analysed thematically (with counts) and a selection reported as direct quotations.
  1. aConsent not required due to routine audit of non-identifiable patient data
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